Pyramid of Khafre

Adjacent to the Pyramid of Khafu is the Pyramid of Khafre. Although the Pyramid of Khafre is somewhat smaller, it is often considered to be the sister structure of Khafu. Constructed in 2570 BC, just a decade after Khafu, the Pyramid of Khafre also belongs to the Fourth Egyptian Dynasty. The Pyramid of Khafre, however, was designed as the final resting place of the Pharaoh Khafre, who is also referred to in history books as Chefren.

Pyramid of Khafre

Although the Pyramid of Khafre is technically smaller than Khafu, it looks bigger at first glance. That’s because Khafre is situated on a bedrock, giving it a major height advantage, and because it boasts steeper sides, giving it more of a pointed top. Construction of the Pyramid of Khafre demonstrates the incredible engineering and design capabilities of the ancient Egyptians, particularly when it comes to choosing blocks of limestone that guarantee structural integrity. At the base of the Pyramid of Khafre, the stones are larger, but they decrease in size as the pyramid reaches its point. However, one noticeable problem with the construction of Khafre ‘ pyramid is that the four corners aren’t positioned perfectly, meaning that the apex has a slight twist rather than pointing up straight to the sky.

Unlike in most pyramids, the Pyramid of Khafre has two separate entrances. Inside the pyramid, there are multiple chambers that are open to the public for you to explore. You’ll want to check out the burial chamber, which boasts large limestone beams across the ceiling. There are also sunken portions in the floor of some chambers, which is where a sarcophagus would likely have been placed.

Some of the best known structures in all of Giza are actually part of the Pyramid of Khafre’s greater complex. Just some of the additional monuments to admire in the area include the Great Sphinx, the Mortuary Temple, the ruins of a satellite pyramid and the Valley Temple.