Pyramid of Lahun

The Pyramid of Lahun, also known as el-Lahun, was constructed under the rule of Senusret II of the 12th Dynasty around 1180 BC. El-Lahun means Mouth of the Canal, and it was indeed situated next to the water. This pyramid is now in ruin, and the causeways and passages within are largely destroyed and inaccessible. Even in the 1840s, when explorers were eager to discover and document as many Egyptian pyramids as possible, the British archeologist Sir Flinders Petrie took months to simply find the entrance to the pyramid itself.

Pyramid of Lahun

The entrance to the Pyramid of Lahun was hidden in the courtyard on the south side of the structure, despite the north side being the typical entrance for religious reasons. The Pyramid of Lahun is one of the first pyramids in Egypt where protecting the contents, and providing security to the tomb, was regarded as even more important than following historic protocol.

Although there are no remnants, the exterior of the Pyramid of Lahun is believed to have been covered in decorated granite. Natural limestone already in place was used as an efficient base for the pyramid, making construction easier than normal. A smaller black granite pyramid was likely placed at the top of the structure to form its apex.